heading

The cars Lamborghini never built, but should have

Date posted : May 18. 2020

Lamborghini cars have been leaving the factory doors since 1963, and these days more than 8,000 cars are built each year, most of them being the new Urus, but that hasn't always been the case, back in the Sixties the production number was much lower, and Lamborghini started with only one model with no variants, when something new was added they created a new model for it, like with the 350GT, they increased the engine displacement to 4-liter and apart from a few 'interim' models this became the 400GT, only to be replaced by the Islero which was succeeded by the Jarama.

Today many only know the supercars from Sant'Agata like the Huracán and the Aventador, or the Super SUV called the Urus, but back in the Sixties and Seventies Lamborghini was famous for front-engined GT cars, comfortable and high power ... the Miura was a preview of things to come for the next decades.

But let's take a look at some of the variants on cars made in Sant'Agata, but these specials were never built ... but just imagine they would have been ordered by some wealthy customers, one-off bespoke customs that would be put in production ... somewhat like the Countach LP400S, which we all know came to fruition because Walter Wolf ordered his Countach to be designed and developed for him.

A 350GTF or Gran Turismo Familiare

What if there would have been a Flying Spur inspired production version of the 350/400 GT

Back then Touring created the one-off Flying Spur II based on a Lamborghini 400GT, completely changed the style of the beautiful Lamborghini, but imagine if Ferruccio would have taken the roofline design from the Flying Spur and had Touring recreate that onto the production body of the 350GT model ... that would have created a stunning, Italian Shooting Brake for sure.

The Islero GT Spyder

With the angular lines on the Lamborghini Islero, a Spyder version would have looked amazing

From the predecessor, only two 350 GTS were built, but I think the angular styling of the Lamborghini Islero would have made a great looking GT Spyder version too, with the roof being kept under a hard tonneau cover much like on the 350 GTS, the side profile would be really beautiful indeed.

The Jarama GTF

An estate is called a Familiare in Italy, so this Jarama GT Familiare would have been a great idea

Back in the Sixties and Seventies, the estate cars became highly demanded in Europe, cars like the Aston Martin Shooting Brake have become highly sought after now, so what if Lamborghini would have gone that way with the Jarama and created an option of a Familiare version. Complete with long roof, tailgate window that opened up to reveal some nice luggage space, and naturally keeping the small ducktail at the edge of the roof ... all in all, this Jarama looks really nice.

A Jarama Spyder

A Lamborghini Jarama Spyder would require a totally different rear, note the little duck tail

If you like open-air driving like I do, you would want to get a Lamborghini with a drop-top, and that would have to be a Jarama when they were in production. This time a canvas roof that folds down underneath a soft tonneau cover, most likely have to sacrifice the rear seats and introduce a luggage cover like on the 350GTS, however in case of the Jarama Spyder with that small ducktail at the edge.

A four-door Lamborghini Espada

Bertone actually had a design ready for a four-door Espada ... but image it having suicide doors

I know Bertone had a design for a four-door Espada ready, and there is the Frua Faena, but we're talking about a Lamborghini in the late Sixties and early Seventies you would need something special when they would build a four-door version ... so why not have suicide doors on the Espada, wouldn't that be special? They had it on the Lincoln in the Sixties, and we all know the Espada as the Italian Rolls Royce, so suicide doors would make sense.

The Lamborghini Espada Convertible

A convertible version of the Lamborghini Espada would need a large canvas roof to stow

In the Seventies, we would see the large Mercedes SE Convertible and the Rolls Royce Corniche, so I'm sure there would be customers for a Convertible version of the Lamborghini Espada, plush leather interior under a canvas roof while still offering four seats ... speed, luxury, and open-top cruising ... Italian style.

The Miura Roadster

I think production of a Lamborghini Miura Roadster would really have been a good idea

In a list like this I surely couldn't leave out the amazing looking Lamborghini Miura Roadster, only one was ever made as a concept, but I believe a production version would have sold too, so I modified the rear section slightly so you can admire the air filters from the side too, but other than that I feel the original Miura Roadster was just about perfect already.

A Jalpa Spyder

Despite a Jalpa Spyder prototype, I think this design would have sold very well

I know they made a couple of prototypes for what could have become the Lamborghini Jalpa Spyder, but let's be honest, the blue one in the family museum isn't the best looking Spyder ... I went with a different design, holding a canvas folding top under a soft, leather tonneau cover, and I think this design would have been a success if they would have offered this back in the late Eighties.

The LM002 Estate

An actual production version of the Lamborghini LM002 Estate would have been nice

Sure they made a bespoke, one-off LM002 Estate for a wealthy customer, but that one also had a raised roof, which made it look weird and out of proportion, but what if Lamborghini would have just enclosed the rear section of the LM002 with a bodyline that was a continuation of the original design, that would have been a much more balanced profile and could seat 7 people ... an SUV in true Lamborghini style.

The next-generation Espada

Production of an Estoque super sedan with Espada inspired window design would be amazing

When they unveiled the Estoque concept in Paris, people were very impressed by it, sadly Lamborghini went with a Super SUV instead of a four-door super sedan, but just imagine if they would have developed the Estoque into the next generation Espada with a side window design inspired by that classic V12 luxury cruiser ... I think that would have looked really nice.

The Aventador GT-J

I really liked the Aventador J, so a coupe version like an Aventador GTJ would be nice to have.

I was at the press conference in Geneva when Lamborghini unveiled the Aventador J, a stunning car with no roof whatsoever, but sadly a one-off that was already sold by the time we got to see it ... just imagine if they would have taken that style for a closed coupe version ... something like an Aventador GT-J for instance ... I think orders would pour in for that one.

The Huracán Barchetta

Why wouldn't they do a one-off Huracan Barchetta? Low windshield, no roof ... pure fun

Usually, the one-off or very limited models from Sant'Agata are based on the V12 flagship of that era but think about this one ... a Barchetta version of the V10 Huracán, slightly different body styling coupled with a low windshield and roll-over bars behind the carbon fiber, lightweight seats ... no roof available and fixed side windows ... that would be so much fun to drive.

The new GT model

There is talk about a new GT model from Lamborghini in the future, so a four-door super sedan might be possible

There is a rumor about Lamborghini adding a fourth model to the lineup after the success of the Urus, and this might be a return to the GT class with a front-mounted engine ... so if we take inspiration from the Urus and translate that into a design for a four-door Super Sedan we might end up with a design like this.

The crazy LM002 6x6

With all the 6x6 craze lately, wouldn't it be a great idea to create a six-wheel drive LM002

Ok, this one might not have been a good idea for Lamborghini to build ... but just think about it, these days everyone is crazy about those massive 6x6 off-road vehicles, be it the factory-built Mercedes or the custom-built US models ... so if money is no object, and you just happen to own an LM002 it would be really impressive to lift the suspension and add a third axle at the rear, extend the back ... and you end up with a one of a kind LM002 ... or would that become an LM006 then?

Text © Mark Smeyers - www.lambocars.com

Printed from www.lambocars.com/lambonews/the_cars_lamborghini_never_built_but_should_have.html on August 5. 2020