Lamborghini seems to be in a hurry to reveal the final model in the V10 Huracán range with a new video showcasing the off-road capabilities of a car we all know as the Huracán Sterrato, however, I wouldn’t be surprised if the powers in Sant’Agata suddenly decide to give this final hurray a different name, but the bottom line is that this high-riding edition of the very popular Huracán V10 range will be the swansong of the model, and I’m not sure if you will still be able to get an order for this raised-suspension V10 in at the time of reading, as they announced the replacement will be unveiled in 2024, 2025 at the latest, so is there still enough production capacity for this Sterrato before the Linea Huracán has to be converted to start building the successor.

And while we do enjoy the video Lamborghini released on their YouTube channel for this ‘Beyond the Concrete’ model, I still doubt there is a large market that wants to drive a Huracán into the dunes or the desert, I might be wrong in this assumption, but if I wanted to do some off-roading in a Lamborghini, I would opt for the Urus which is a Super SUV, with an even higher suspension, and still packing a lot of power from that twin-turbo V8 at the front, in the latest Urus Performante we’re even looking at 666 hp, while the Huracán EVO comes with just 631 bhp, sure the STO and Tecnica boast 640 hp, but will the Sterrato get the engine from the STO?

Now, I will be the first to admit it must be great fun to drive the Huracán Sterrato off-road, but won’t that gimic become old very quickly I ask myself. And yes, you get roof bars, which will probably make a ton of wind noise at speed just like those bars to fit a skybox on the roof, however, I do like the additional LED lights on the front bumper and those wide wheel arch extensions, but I can get both on a regular Huracán too, so where’s the attraction in this uncommon rally-style supercar?

I can’t help but see parts from the ‘old’ Huracán Performante in the front bumper and rear section with those raised tailpipes, and while there is some grille on the air intakes on the rear fender, it seems that does block some of the cool air for the engine bay, so Lamborghini fitted a scoop on the engine cover pulling in outside air above the roof, which makes sense as this is an off-road model, so dirt and gravel could easily make its way into the lower intakes, but somehow that intake looks like an afterthought, just ‘glued’ on top of the regular, non-glass, engine cover, so is this just a mock-up, or is it actually functional?

This brings us to another interesting news item, this time from the Squadra Corse department at Sant’Agata, in the form of the Lamborghini LMDh race car for the 2024 Le Mans 24h endurance race, to be entered into the Hypercar class of the FIA World Endurance Championship and the GTP class of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, and to adhere with the strict regulations of that series, this car must come with a hybrid power unit consisting of an internal combustion engine and an Energy Recovery System with a combined output of max 500 kW or 681 hp, and now comes the interesting part: this race car will be powered by a twin-turbo, 90° V8 engine combined with a single source ERS kit.

So will the replacement for the Lamborghini Huracán no longer come with a V10 engine then? Will the successor be powered by a twin-turbo V8 hybrid engine based on the current Urus engine, or perhaps a detuned version of this new race engine? This is now really open for debate, but I think we can be sure we’ve seen the last of the V10 engined cars from Sant’Agata, starting with the Gallardo and ends with the Huracán, the obvious choice to make room and shed weight is to fit a smaller displacement engine with fewer cylinders in the next-generation ‘Baby’ Lamborghini, and as Squadra Corse developed a new V8 for the LMDh model, it would make perfect sense to put a derivative of that powerplant in the new model too, but only time will tell …

For now, some more photos of the upcoming Huracán Sterrato: